Friday, September 30, 2016

New England Lobster Roll

Have you tried making lobster rolls at home? Stuffing your very own lobster roll can’t go wrong! You will have the advantage of stuffing lobsters as much as you want! Keep an eye on prices for lobsters as they go on sale sometimes. Also, many places will steam the lobsters for you at the time of purchase.




New England Lobster Roll
(serves 4 to 6 people)

·      2-3 steamed lobsters (depending on the size)
·      1 celery, minced
·      1 scallion, minced
·      4 to 6 pieces of fresh lettuce
·      Some Italian parsley, minced
·      ¼ cup or 60cc of mayonnaise (Japanese mayo works the best but if you are using the American kind, add a little bit of squeezed lemon juice)
·      4-6 New England style hot dog buns
·      butter
·      salt and pepper for seasoning

1.     Remove the lobster meat from the shell.


2.     Cut the cooked lobster pieces into 1.5cm to 2cm pieces.


3.     Dress the lobster meat with celery, scallion, Italian parsley and mayonnaise. Season with salt and pepper.


4.     Spread the butter on the buns and use a grill pan to grill. Make sure to grill until the surface is crispy.


5.     Assemble your lobster roll by placing one piece of fresh lettuce in a bun and top it off with the lobster salad from step 3.



6.     Serve with fries, sweet potatoes, or onion rings.


★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

New England Steamers

Steamers are very popular in New England. And Yes! Steamers! You can make it at home! Steamer clams could be purchased at most major supermarkets. Adding this menu on your list for gatherings will be a great idea!


New England Steamers

·      2 pounds of steamer clams
·      water
·      beer
·      melted butter

1.     Rinse and soak the clams very well to remove the sand and grits inside. If you are in a hurry, stir the clams in water with your hand.



2.     Add a little bit of beer into a steaming pot with appropriate amount of water for steaming.


3.     Place the clams into the steamer.


4.     Cook until the clamshell opens. Do not throw away the clam broth left inside the pot.


5.     Serve the steamers on a plate with melted butter and clam broth on the side.




How to Eat

1.     Use your fingers to remove the shell by the siphon and pull off the black skin covering the siphon of the clam. Discard the shell and skin.


2.     Dunk in and rinse in the leftover soup from the pot to remove lingering sands.


3.     Dip in the melted butter and eat. And repeat!



4.     Here are pictures of how I serve steamers on a table.



★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

New England Corn Chowder


This incredibly delicious corn chowder is almost as popular as clam chowder here in New England. The key is to use fresh corn off the cob but the frozen ones would work too! 


New England Corn Chowder

·      4 cobs of corn, cut the kernels off the cob (keep the husk)
·      50g, about 3 pieces of thick bacon, cut into 1cm width strips
·      1 onion, minced
·      3 potatoes, cubed into 1-2cm width
·      2 tablespoons of flour  
·      2 cup or 480cc of chicken broth 
·      1 cup or 240cc of milk 
·      ½ cup or 120cc of heavy cream 
·      salt
·      pepper
·      oil

1.     In a heated pot, fry bacon strips and minced onions with some oil.  



2.     When the onion pieces become transparent, add two tablespoons of flour and continue to cook for about 2 minutes. 


3.     Add the chicken broth into the onion and bacon mixture. 


4.     Add cubed potatoes into the soup. Place the lid on the pot and cook until the potatoes are cooked through. (optional: add the corn husks into the soup for extra flavor)


5.     When the potatoes are cooked, add milk and heavy cream into the soup.


6.     Add corn. 




7.     Bring the soup to boil and season with salt and pepper. The soup is ready to serve when the corn is completely cooked through!




★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!