Sunday, October 30, 2016

Japanese home cooking lesson at Haven’s Kitchen NYC





I enjoyed  introducing some  Japanese soul food “Okonomiyaki” and “Karaage (Fried chicken) in NYC last week.  Okonomiyaki  has become a popular dish around the world, and I was sure it would be a hit at Haven’s Kitchen.
The lesson started with making the dessert “Matcha agar jelly parfait”.  Agar is made from seaweed and is used to make the jelly.  It seemed that agar was an interesting ingredient for everyone to use.



Next  I showed how to make easy cucumber pickles and then fried chicken. There are many recipes for fried chicken in Japan.  I chose a delicious version that does not require us to marinate the chicken. I make this fried chicken often at home because it is quick to make and still delivers the taste I crave.



Finally it was Okonomiyaki time! After my demo, everyone prepared their own okonomiyaki batter and fillings in small groups.  Then they all cooked their own Okonomiyaki on the stove top. It was the most fun part of the class! Lots of smiles and laughter were had while making the Okonomiyaki.  I am sure everyone will make it again at their homes.


 

 
 

I had a wonderful  time teaching Japanese cooking  at Haven’s Kitchen this summer.  I taught 4 lesson sets and each was a great experience.  I can’t wait to be back in Spring for another set. I hope to see you all there!

I will post my future lessons and event schedules on this blog, facebook, and Instagram so please follow me.



★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!






Friday, October 28, 2016

Quiche Lorraine

For this classic quiche Lorraine, I use Japanese mushrooms called Shimeji. It gives a rich flavor and a kick of “umami”. You can make your own tart or buy frozen ones from the stores. Nothing can beat the homemade tart crust so I included the recipe!


Quiche Lorraine
(Use 9inch or 24cm deep-dish pan)

Quiche Tart
·      150g of all-purpose flour
·      5 tablespoons of butter, cut into small cubes
·      1 egg, beaten
·      ½ to 1 tablespoon of milk
·      ½ teaspoon of salt

Filling
·      100g of bacon, cut into ½ inch pieces
·      1 onion, sliced thinly
·      150g of Shimeji mushrooms or regular mushrooms (Shimeji has more “umami”)
·      3 eggs, beaten
·      100cc of heavy cream
·      80cc of milk
·      ¼ teaspoon of salt
·      a pinch of black pepper
·      50g of gruyere cheese, grated
·      1 teaspoon of fresh thyme
·      1 tablespoon of olive oil

Tart Crust
1.     In a food processor, combine flour and butter. Pulse to mix until the butter breaks into small pieces.


2.     Add the beaten egg and milk and pulse until it forms into a ball.


3.     Place the dough on a lightly floured cutting board and roll it out into a size of a CD. Saran wrap the dough and let it rest in the fridge for 30min.


4.     Take out the dough from the fridge and roll it out into a disk that's about an inch bigger than the tart pan.



5.     Place the dough on the tart pan. Press it firmly into the corners and ridges of the pan. Cut out unnecessary dough. Dock the dough with a fork and let it rest in the fridge for 30min.


6.     Preheat oven to 200or 400F°. Line the interior of tart with parchment paper and place pie weights or dry beans on top of the parchment paper to prevent expansion. Bake for 15min. Remove the weights and parchment paper, and bake for another 10-15min.


7.     Place it on a cooling rack and allow the tart crust to cool down.

Filling
1.     Reheat oven to 180or 350F°.
2.     In a heated saucepan, add olive oil and sauté onions, bacon, mushrooms, and thyme until it softens.


3.     Place the filling in the tart.


4.     In a bowl, combine eggs, heavy cream, milk, cheese, salt, and pepper. Mix well.
5.     Pour the egg mix over the filling.




6.     Bake for 25-30min.



7.     Place it on a cooling rack and let it cool down for over 15min before cutting. Then serve.


★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Cauliflower Soup

This is an easy-to-follow, healthy, and cozy cauliflower soup for the chilly mornings and nights. Feel free to adjust the thickness of soup by substituting the heavy cream with milk.


Cauliflower Soup

·      ½ cauliflower head
·      200g or 1-2 potatoes
·      ½ of an onion
·      1 clove of garlic
·      400cc of water
·      1 bouillon cube
·      100cc of heavy cream
·      salt and pepper
·      1 bay leaf
·      ½ tablespoon of butter
·      ½ tablespoon of olive oil

1.     Break the cauliflower into small florets. Thinly slice the onions and potatoes. Mince the garlic.



2.     In a pot, heat up the olive oil and butter. Stir-fry the onion, minced garlic and thyme leaf in the pot.


3.     Once the onions are translucent, add the sliced potatoes and cauliflower florets. Continue to stir-fry.


4.     After the vegetables are well coated with oil, add water and bouillon cube.


5.     Cook until the vegetables are soft, and turn off the heat.


6.     Using a hand blender, juicer, or food processor, pulse/puree the soup until it’s smooth and creamy.


7.     Add heavy cream and turn the heat back on. Season the soup with salt and pepper. Remove from heat right before it boils.



8.     Serve with a loaf of bread on a soup bowl.



★If you are interested in Japanese cuisine then check out my other articles in the Washoku.Guide!